Október 23., péntek 16.30 / ANISCREEN presents: „ÉLŐ SZEREPLŐS ANIMÁCIÓS GYAKORLATOK” 

Born in 1982, Eliška Decka is a founder of the non-profit organization AniScreen, curating and producing screenings of independent animated shorts in various mostly non-cinematic locations (e.g. galleries, cafés etc.). She has been a free-lance journalist for over a decade, publishing mainly about cinema and animation in particular. She’s currently also a PhD candidate at FAMU Prague after finishing her MA’s in Film Studies and Law at Charles University Prague. Her PhD research focuses on the connection between animation theory and practice, with a special interest in gender issues and social influences on animation and vice versa. She’s been a member of the academic Society of Animation Studies since 2009 and presented papers at its annual conferences in Atlanta, Edinburgh, Athens and Toronto. She teaches at J. A. Komensky University and FAMU in Prague and collaborates as a curator and jury member with various international animation festivals.

Eliska’s organization AniScreen is a non-profit organization with a goal of promoting independent short auteur animation among new audiences. They try to raise awareness of this type of animation (not so much present in the traditional cinema distribution) by organizing various site-specific screenings (e.g. they screened a selection of short animations about hair in a Prague hair salon), official premiers of new animated films and by collaborations with various animation festivals. AniScreen believes that thanks to its original curating approach while taking films out of traditional screening spaces, it can be appealing to new types of audience and spectators who might realize (sometimes for the first time ever) that animation has much more faces then the “big studios-children-entertaining-blockbuster” one.

As a researcher of contemporary independent female animation, what do you think are the challenges women has to face in this specific art form and field of work?

Talking about women in animation is such complicated and complex issue. I think it’s basically the same as in any other field of our lives. It’s always only for the best when men and women are equally included and represented because we’re, generally speaking and I’m aware of that, usually different creatures with usually different live experiences and social expectations put on us, no matter whether we like it or appreciate that some women animators bring much more interesting multi-layered female characters into animation. It’s nice to see some different role models than Disney’s princesses.

Why do you think there are so many Czech student animations which combine live action with animation, that you could easily make a whole compilation out of them?

I think that especially in these days – when animation is so omnipresent and capable to collaborate with so many different media – it’s very important to push students to learn how to include live actors into the very specific ambiance of the animated world. I’m really happy that these kinds of “live actor animated exercises”, which I’m presenting in the Czech screening, are part of the obligatory educational plans in both animation departments of FAMU and Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague. You can also see that many students could actually find themselves in those exercises and used live actors also in their final thesis films.

Czech animation has its classics that we all know, including films by Jirí Trnka or Jan Svankmajer. What do you think are the most important trends in contemporary Czech animation?

It’s really difficult to pinpoint some contemporary trends because there aren’t really so many animated auteur films produced outside of animated departments at art schools. It’s mostly about few very persistent successful individuals who are willing to continue to animate no matter what. Regarding some actual trends, I think that generally it’s nice that the young generation is successfully trying to find their own voice and topics, totally different from topics common before 1989, during the communist era. I appreciate that as a viewer and also as a teacher and an animation theorist, because it’s never easy to follow up such great artists as Švankmajer or Trnka.

AniScreen at Primanima 2015 presents the following works made by Czech animation students from FAMU, AAAD Prague and Tomas Bata University in Zlín.

ZLÍNI LEVES / ZLÍN SOUPAkile Nazli KAYA 2007 08’ 41” UTB

OTA TULIL • Anna MASTNÍKOVÁ 2013 06’ 18” AAAD

VÁKUM / VACUUM Daniela PASEKOVÁ, Mikoláš PEŠEK • 2012 • 2’ 00” • AAAD
SZÉK / CHAIRPavol SERIŠ,Vojtěch DOMLÁTIL • 2012 • 01’ 28” • AAAD
SUPER EMA
Ema KŘÍŽOVÁ, Jan NETUŠIL, Tereza TYDLITÁTOVÁ, Matouš VYHNÁNEK • 2012 • 01’ 21” • AAAD

PUNCH AND JUDY • Martin MÁJ • 2013 • 06’ 04” • FAMU  

GRAFITTIGRIS / GRAFITTIGERLibor PIXA • 2010 • 11’ 00” •  FAMU

HOPSCOTCH – DEEP DARK FEARS • Pavel SOUKUP • 2015 • 0’ 30” • AAAD
INTO THE SPACE • Linda RETTEROVÁ • 2015 • 0’ 48” • AAAD
LIGHT DEEP DARK FEARS • Pavel SOUKUP • 2015 • 0’ 23” • AAAD

M.O. • Jakub KOUŘIL • 2012 • 06’ 34” • FAMU

KONYHAMESÉK / KITCHEN TALES • Vojtěch DOMLÁTIL • 2013 • 07’ 26” • AAAD

HÁTIZSÁK / RUCKSACK • Rozálie KIRSCHOVÁ • 2012 • 02’ 21” • AAAD

TONI ÉS BACILUS ÚR / TONI AND MR. ILLNESS • Kateřina KARHÁNKOVÁ • 2015 • 04’ 16” • FAMU

Hírek

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